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Why Child Care Needs Help to Survive COVID-19’s Impact

Published August 10, 2020

Submitted by Cindy Lehnhoff, Director of the National Child Care Center, on behalf of and with the permission of Tracy Jost, Child Care Owner/Operator in Maryland

Stories from the field: Child Care Providers Facing Closure without Substantially MoreFederal Government Support

Tracy Jost is the owner of Kids Campus Child Care Center in Calvert County, Maryland.  She has proudly owned and operated the facility for 14 years. Tracy, along with her staff, have worked tirelessly to achieve a rating of 4 in the state Quality Rating Improvement System: Maryland EXCELS. A 4 is considered one of the top ratings awarded to early education and child care programs that are meeting nationally recognized standards and best practices.  Prior to COVID-19, Tracy’s center was at full capacity with 150 children enrolled. When the Governor announced that Maryland’s child care centers could only serve essential personnel, the attendance at Kids Campus immediately dropped to only 35 children and then over time grew to 50 children enrolled.

Of the original 150 children enrolled, 100 were children to non-essential parents, therefore not eligible for care, while others were kept home by their parents to avoid any Covid-19 risk. Several families immediately withdrew while others followed as time went on. The remaining families have been paying a discounted weekly tuition fee meant to reserve a spot for their child when the Governor re-opens child care centers for all children. Tracy understands that parents are fearful and therefore will continue to keep their children at home until they are comfortable and confident that it is safe.

With less children attending and therefore less families paying tuition costs, Tracy’s revenue has dropped substantially.  Fortunately, Kids Campus qualified for the PPP loan/grant that was extended to small businesses under the CARES Act.  This has helped her cover her labor cost and a few other expenses for an 8-week period.  With the funds from the loan running out in a few short weeks, Tracy will struggle like so many other providers with covering the expenses of running a high quality child care center. Unless Congress passes another bill that includes substantial support for licensed child care, Tracy is not sure how long she can stay in business if her enrollment does not increase in the near future. 

There are other obstacles that make it difficult for Tracy, other providers in Maryland as well as families to navigate the Covid-19 pandemic:

In order to meet social distancing guidelines throughout the day, child care providers have to lower their operational capacity to keep children further apart. As a result of this, more qualified staff must be present in the center to ensure that the minimal licensing standard of keeping all children within sight and sound at all times is maintained. Reducing the operational capacity decreases a center's weekly revenue while having to provide additional staff increases operational costs.

Middle class working parents spend on average 10-14% of their income for child care. Therefore, they cannot bear the burden of an increase to the cost of care. We know from experience that when child care cost increases, families are often forced to choose cheaper unsafe options which do not include a high-quality early education program like the one offered at Kids Campus Child Care Center.

Operational cost has also increased to allow for additional cleaning and sanitizing throughout the day.While high quality child care providers have always been extremely mindful and attentive to preventing the spread of illness, the COVID-19 pandemic has required staff to triple their daily cleaning routines which, of course, has increased their expenses.Locating cleaning and sanitation supplies has been exceedingly difficult.

Tracy and many other licensed centers that have remained opened in Maryland are struggling to remain in business due to the impact of Covid-19. It is well-known that prior to COVID-19, child care centers were already operating on thin margins. This is why owners and operators like Tracy cannot afford to stay in business and offer quality early care and education at the highest level if the current situation persists without additional financial support by our Federal Government.  With the money from the CARES Act running out in June, many providers are uncertain about their ability to remain open or as many centers have closed, their ability to reopen their facilities. Knowing this, Congress must act now to SAVE child care so that America’s economy can recover.  Without a solid child care infrastructure in place working parents will not be able to return to work.  An additional $50B dollars is needed to ensure that centers like Tracy’s can remain open and operating safely now and long into the future.   

Thank you for taking the necessary action to SAVE the ESSENTIAL CHILD CARE INFRASTRUCTURE of the United States!

Cindy Lehnhoff

NCCA Director
NECPA Policy Advisor

JOIN NCCA

Published August 8, 2020


Now more than ever before, is the time that your support is needed from The National Child Care Association! We need to show our Legislators that we have a strong voice of thousands of early childcare educators and centers. 

We also have more to offer than ever before to our members. You may not have known but your $30 annual support (individuals) and $100 (centers) gives you ALL the following resources and benefits - https://www.nccanet.org/page/Benefits.

This is the time to stay together and advocate for our children while growing your own personal professionalism and showcasing to your parents why your center is different from the rest! 

We are here to answer any questions you have. Give us a call at 877-537-NCCA (6222) if you have questions about renewing or joining. And, please forward this to your circle of influence, encouraging them to join, too. Thank you!

Check and see if your membership is still active HERE.

If you need to renew, want to refer a colleague or join please click HERE.

Make the Call!

Published July 27, 2020

We STILL NEED $50 billion for child care!

Our Legislators are still discussing The Child Care is Essential Act. Contact your Senators now and let them know we need more funding! 


Thank you for using your voice!


Here is our Executive Director, Cindy reminding us how important YOUR VOICE IS!
Watch the video.  

Your Silence Allows Then To Ignore Us!

Published July 14, 2020

Urgent: we need your help NOW more than ever!! We are waiting for the Senate to release another COVID-19 relief package. We are NOT giving up in our pursuit of the $50 billion funding relief request. Therefore, we are organizing our next Call-In Day for this Thursday, July 16th.

Senate Republicans are expected to introduce their next COVID package on July 20th. The Senate's last day in session is August 7th which leaves little time to respond to the package once it’s presented. Therefore, our advocacy is crucial in the coming weeks. We've heard that the package will have small provisions for housing, child care, and food assistance. That means it is up to our advocacy to put the pressure on to not only increase the size of the package but to target relief to the most in need, including to secure at least $50 billion in child care funding needed to save our system. This is critical. We encourage everyone to reach out to their delegation members, particularly in the Senate, and the makeup of your delegation will determine the strategy.

Some talking points:
For Republicans who are in leadership – educate them on the scope of the need, especially how child care is impacting by states reopening and the cascading impact of limited K-12 availability in the fall, and the structure of the stabilization fund through the exiting pathway of the CCDBG being the right mechanism.  

For Republicans who are not in leadership positions – do the education above and make sure to ask them to weigh in with leadership that child care funding needs to be a priority in the next package (and if you can talk to them about funding, do it!).

For Democrats who are in leadership – educate them about the Child Care is Essential Act, and why at least $50B in direct assistance through a stabilization fund (that goes through CCDBG) needs to be in the next package.

For Democrats who are already cosponsoring the CCE Act – ask them to continue to raise awareness publicly, weigh in with other members to get them on the bill, and ask them to weigh in with leadership that this is a priority for the next fight.

For Democrats who are not cosponsoring the CCE Act – educate them about the funding needs and the bill, and see if you can get them to cosponsor.

America is in the middle of a child care crisis - please, please help us reach our goal of $50 billion in relief funding by joining us in our next Call-In Day, Thursday, July 16th!



State Organizations can have all their members become NCCA members - gaining all our benefits, too!

Published July 14, 2020

The National Child Care Association would like to extend a great big "thank you" to our current and past members. We have 11,000 supporters and counting. If you are an individual who works in the field, in a field that supports childcare, or are a parent that uses childcare, we invite you to become a member of NCCA today! Individuals may join for $30 a year, while providers and businesses that support NCCA and our advocacy can join for $100 a year. 

Did you know that some of you are able to join through your state association? Specifically in the states of Maryland, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah. If you are a member of one of these state associations, you can take advantage of NCCA benefits as well! 

Our number one benefit is advocacy. We work in Washington DC on making sure that we provide a voice in all the legislation, rules, and regulations that trickle down to benefit quality child care programs. We need your continued support now more than ever. Creating a unified voice for early child care is critical and we are working on your behalf to ensure we are heard! 

Additionally, members enjoy unique savings through our national partners. Namely, providers receive 10% off their first-time accreditation fees and national credentials with the National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA).

We are also excited to announce we have entered a partnership with Quorum and Kaplan Learning Company providing professional developmental training that will help you get a credential in early child care (which we need more and more of). For the price of $79.95, you can take the hours you need to obtain those credentials.

We have many more member benefits which you can read about here: https://www.nccanet.org/page/Benefits

If you are a former member of NCCA, we truly appreciate your past membership to NCCA and we want to invite you to support us again. In addition to the many benefits offered, your annual commitment of $100 or less will come back to you through discount programs and other member benefits! 

Please help us continue our mission by becoming a member today.

 



The Importance For Advocacy - NCCA director Cindy Lehnhoff met with CEO of Inspire Care 360, Tony D'Agostino

Published June 29, 2020

Recently, NCCA director Cindy Lehnhoff met with CEO of Inspire Care 360, Tony D'Agostino to discuss several key topics concerning childcare in America today.

The first item of importance is the need for advocacy. Cindy explains that "we" (those who work in and support child care) have always needed advocacy, but we need it now more than ever. What childcare lacks is a voice that has come together in the industry to speak up for themselves. Cindy has been a part of this industry for 40 years as a teacher, director, district manager, and vice president, and therefore has experience balancing quality and financial excellence and understands the NEED for this voice.

She explains that if we pulled together, the industry could be a part of putting in rules and regulations in place and ask for the funding to do it. When US Congress steps up and says that they are going to take the initiative to change something about childcare to make it high quality, they write bills and budgets, but they don't actually take the time to "cost it out". They don't look at what it costs the industry, and rarely are practitioners brought to the table to give their opinions and present the reality of the situation.

For example, when it was decided that every licensed childcare center would do FBI fingerprinting, it put a lot of cost on providers. The fingerprinting itself is a good thing, but there should have been funding provided. In this industry, it often feels like lawmakers and institutional higher-ups don't give the actual providers a say.

Cindy notes that legislators respond better if they hear from their constituents, their voters. Cindy is calling for advocacy at the national level. Most advocacy the providers are participating in is at the state level. Which is good, but states can only do so much. The federal government only provides so much support. Cindy believes we are not asking for the right things at the federal level as an industry, but the way it works is that you need money or a big voice to be heard. Our voice has to come together to accomplish more.

The rest of the webinar goes on to expand creating one ECE voice post COVID-19, what if we had been better prepared for Covid-19, and NCCA's vision, mission, and values. To watch, please click here: https://www.inspirecare360.com/creating-one-ece-voice-post-covid-19/.


Please Take This Survey

Published by June 22, 2020

Our friends at Child Care Aware asked us to share this information with you.

We wanted to send a quick request for your help in spreading the word about critical study of the likely spread of COVID-19 in child care programs being conducted by the Yale School of Medicine, "COVID-19 Infection Rates and Mitigation in U.S. Child Care Programs: A Natural Experiment of Critical Implications for Reopening Child Care and Public Schools (PDF download)" (Yale IRB # 2000028232). 

This is one of the largest workforce epidemiological studies ever attempted-in fact, almost 100,000 child care providers have already responded! But, we still need your help in reaching the massive number of child care respondents needed to conduct a study of this size. Please share this linked email with child care providers in your community.

As a reminder, the survey takes 12-20 minutes and is hosted through a secured online survey platform and maintained in a de-identified state to ensure confidentiality. It asks about COVID-19 exposure and symptoms, as well as methods of reducing the spread of the virus. We have to act fast in getting data- before child care programs reopen-in order to generate useful policy recommendations. 

Thank you in advance for sharing the survey with your community and for your continued work in child care.



Continue To Share Your Stories

Published June 16, 2020

As an increasing number of cities and states move toward reopening, the child care industry is still reeling from the impact of coronavirus. Without child care, there will be barriers for parents who want to return to or find work. That's the urgent message Child Care Aware is sharing with its new campaign: No Child Care, No Recovery (#NoChildCareNoRecovery).

The goal of this new video series is to highlight the struggles that families and child care providers are facing during this time, and how vital a strong, stable child care industry will be to an effective economic recovery. While the Senate considers the best path forward for additional COVID-19 relief, make sure they know, #NoChildCareNoRecovery. Please email and tweet at your Senator now to share these stories! 

Visit the #NoChildCareNoRecovery Story Hub (located at: https://www.childcareaware.org/coronavirus/child-care-and-covid-19-stories-from-the-field/

Here is an excerpt from one story. 

Dana and Scott Barnhart are the owners of Kiddie Academy of Kent Island in Stevensville, Maryland. They have proudly owned and operated their center for 5 years. Dana, along with her staff, has worked tirelessly to achieve a rating of 5 in the state Quality Rating Improvement System: Maryland EXCELS. Unfortunately, in mid- April the center had a COVID-19 exposure and they had to shut down for a minimum of two weeks. They had planned to reopen on May 4th but after learning only 20 children were going to return, they decided not to move forward at that time. At this level of enrollment, their projected loss would average about $30,000 a month. They had reached a point of having to consider closing forever.

There are other obstacles that make it difficult for the Barnhart's as well as other providers and families in Maryland to navigate the crisis that the Covid-19 pandemic has created for child care:

- In order to meet social distancing guidelines throughout the day, child care providers have to lower their operational capacity to keep children further apart. As a result of this, more qualified staff must be present in the center to ensure that the minimal licensing standard of keeping all children within sight and sound at all times is maintained. Reducing the operational capacity decreases a center's weekly revenue while having to provide additional staff increases operational costs.

- Middle class working parents spend on average 10-14% of their income for child care. Therefore, they cannot bear the burden of an increase to the cost of care. We know from experience that when child care cost increases, families are often forced to choose cheaper unsafe options which do not include a high-quality early education program like the one offered at Kiddy Academy of Kent Island.

- Operational cost has also increased to allow for additional cleaning and sanitizing throughout the day. While high-quality child care providers have always been extremely mindful and attentive to preventing the spread of illness, the COVID-19 pandemic has required staff to triple their daily cleaning routines which, of course, has increased their expenses. Locating cleaning and sanitation supplies has been exceedingly difficult.

We encourage you to read through other stories to truly grasp why we need our Senators to come through and fund child care- it's essential! 


Child Care is Essential Act

Published 6/8/2020

Rep. DeLauro, Rep. Scott, and Sen. Murray (along with other cosponsors) have introduced a bill providing $50 billion in funding to stabilize the child care industry. This bill is a crucial part of the strategy to elevate the needs of the child care field in the ongoing COVID-19 relief legislation conversation.

We know that child care providers are absolutely essential to this nation and have been among the hardest hit for the COVID-19 pandemic. About half of providers have stayed open throughout this crisis to serve children of other essential workers so that those workers can serve their communities. Even so, with the reduction in enrollment and the consequential drop in revenue, child care providers are struggling. Some providers are even facing closure. According to analysis from the Center for American Progress, the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to a permanent loss of nearly 4.5 million child care slots, leaving millions of families without the child care they need to return to work. And Americans are indeed returning to work more and more as the days go on. So how can we ensure they will have access to necessary and essential child care?

The Child Care Is Essential Act would provide grant funding to child care providers to stabilize the child care sector and support providers to safely reopen and operate. Administered through the existing Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) lead agency of each state, tribe or territory, grants would be available to licensed, regulated, or registered child care providers that are currently open or temporarily closed due to COVID-19, regardless of whether they had previously received funding through CCDBG. Grant awards would be determined by providers’ pre-COVID-19 operating costs and adjusted to reflect the additional cost of providing care due to the pandemic. Grants would be equitably distributed to eligible child care centers, home-based child care providers, and family child care homes.

Initial cost estimates suggest that modifications necessary to respond to COVID-19 may increase providers’ costs by as much as 30 percent. The $50 billion in funding will help providers not only open but purchase
necessary supplies, reduce group sizes and adjust staffing to lower the risk of infection, and modify classroom space and materials.

We need you to act to pass this bill! Have you called or emailed your members of Congress to let them know the urgency in passing a bill that provides $50 billion to childcare? Find out more about contacting your representations at nccanet.org.

We need YOUR VOICE!


Published June 6, 2020

Some exciting developments happened last week that we are thankful to share! Representative DeLauro, Representative Scott, and Senator Murray (along with other co-sponsors) have introduced a bill providing $50 billion in funding to stabilize the child care industry. National Women's Law Center (NWLC) has endorsed this bill, which is a crucial part of the strategy to elevate the needs of the child care field in the ongoing COVID-19 relief legislation conversation. Key links are below; we encourage you to amplify this ask/bill on social and in your conversations with Federal policymakers around the needs of the child care sector.

Thank you so much!

Congressional press release
Short one pager summarizing the bill
Bill text
NYT article highlighting the need

Your Story Matters

We know that child care educators and employees are the backbone to our economy and that "America cannot go back to work without child care"! We can help SAVE our child care centers by telling members of Congress what we need and why we need it.  Sharing your COVID-19 story and how it is affecting your ability to do business is a way of getting their attention.  Reba Rochelle, a provider from Oklahoma shared her story with us and we forwarded it on to be shared with key members of Congress.   After reading  Reba's story please think about sharing your story with us at admin@nccanet.org

Reba's Story

Reba Rochelle has been the owner/operator of a licensed and nationally accredited child care program in Lawton, Oklahoma for 24 years. Kindercastle, the name of her center, is licensed for 75 children. She has always been able to maintain a full enrollment because of her reputation as a high-quality early care and education center. Even though Reba's daily attendance dropped to an average of 13 children per day due to the COVID-19 pandemic she decided to remain open for those families still needing care. However, she voluntarily closed her center for three weeks after learning that four of her customers, all nurses, had to be quarantined at the hospital where they worked. Unfortunately, two of the four tested positive for COVID-19. Prior to reopening she spent $4000 to have her center professionally cleaned and sanitized. Since reopening her daily attendance has continued to be extremely low with an average of 13 children in care. Because the majority of her families are no longer attending, her weekly revenue is not enough to cover her expenses. She has been able to keep going because of the help she has received from the CARES Act. Specifically, the PPP funds. Unfortunately, this money is running out because it was only provided for an 8-week period. To date Congress has not passed a bill that will continue to help Reba or other providers like her. The CARES Act also provided some additional, but minimal funding to child care providers through the Child Care Development Block Grant fund. Because the grant allows for a lot of flexibility each state has given different levels of support to their child care providers. Sadly, for children and licensed providers, Oklahoma has actually chosen to use some of their funding to pay a family member that is 18 years of age or older to keep a child at home for $25 a day. The only other requirement for this individual is they have to pass a state only background check versus the full background check that licensed child care center owners and employees must have that includes the following:

  • FBI Finger Printing
  • Sex Offender Registry Check from both State and National Registries or Repositories
  • State Based Child Abuse Registry Checks
  • State Based Criminal History Checks

This is occurring in Oklahoma even though federal law requires ALL child care providers to have a comprehensive background check that includes providers who are NOT required to be licensed but care for children receiving federal child care assistance. Because the State of OK is taking advantage of the increased flexibility of CCDBG funds granted by the cares act children may be in the care of a family member not best suited to do so. We all know that just because a child is in the care of a family member does not make it safe and healthy. Young children take a lot of patience and planned activities to keep them occupied. Relatives do not always have the ability or stamina to do this for 10 hours a day, 5 days a week. We also know that many lower income homes currently have a food shortage. Children in high quality licensed care receive a nutritious breakfast, lunch, snacks, and in some cases dinner.

Other concerns that Reba and other Oklahoma providers have include the following:

  • Staff that were furloughed before the PPP funds were provided are now collecting more in unemployment then they would make if they returned to work.
  • In order to ensure social distancing throughout the day child care providers have to actually lower their operational capacity to keep children further apart. This also requires more qualified adults to be present to ensure that the minimal licensing standard of keeping children within sight and sound at all times is maintained. This increases the cost of doing business and child care has not been provided enough of an increase in subsidy payments to allow for this change. Additionally, parents that have to pay for their own care are not in a position to pay more due to the COVID-19 circumstances.
  • Cost have also increased to allow for additional cleaning and sanitizing throughout the day. While high quality child care providers have always been very attentive to keeping the spread of illness to a minimum because young children are still building their immune system, the COVID-19 pandemic has required them to triple their daily routines.

In closing, Reba and many other licensed centers that are still open in Oklahoma are barely hanging on. Many have already closed their doors never to open again. Reba continues to work 12 hours a day from open to close to serve her community, however, she will not be able to stay open much longer without a substantial amount of help from an additional stimulus bill. This additional bill must allot enough money for child care providers as well as ensure rules that restrict states from using federal money to pay for unlicensed care.

Please take a moment to call or email members of Congress to let them know the URGENCY IN PASSING THIS BILL THAT PROVIDES $50B TO CHILD CARE. We've made it easy to contact them. Go to our homepage and the links to your legislators are there. Advocating For Child Care Today will ensure that Child Care is here for many more tomorrows.

Great news for our essential worker: under the CARES ACT, essential workers' children qualify for FREE child care!

Published May 28, 2020

Due to the recent pandemic facing our country, it has been found that families are struggling a bit with the balancing act of parents trying to both work from home and take care of their children at the same time.  With a small application process (that will NOT deny you), you can get the help you and your child(ren) so desperately need to ensure they are not only getting a healthy dose of socializing with their peers, but also continuing to receive education as well.

Lead Agencies have the flexibility to define which workers are essential, in accordance with any relevant State, Territorial, and Tribal laws or policies. Lead Agencies should consult with their jurisdiction's chief executive, and may want to consider:
- Health care and public health workers
- Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders
- Child protective services workers, those who provide services in the child welfare system, and other critical social services workers
- Food and agriculture workers (including grocery store and restaurant workers and food truck delivery drivers)
- Child care workers
- Utility employees
- Water and wastewater employees
- Transportation and logistics workers
- Public works employees
- Communications and information technology workers
- Other community-based government operations and essential function employees
- Critical manufacturing workers
- Hazardous materials workers
- Financial services employees
- Chemical workers
- Defense industrial base employees

Building on these existing options, the CARES Act provides additional flexibility for providing direct child care services to essential workers. Lead Agencies may use CARES Act funds to provide child care assistance to health care sector employees, emergency responders, sanitation workers, and other workers deemed essential by public officials during the response to COVID-19, without regard to the income eligibility requirements. Therefore, Lead Agencies may provide CCDF subsidies to essential workers whose income exceeds 85 percent of State median income.

If you are nervous about the safety of your children going back to a childcare facility, there is no reason to worry! Childcare workers of high-quality centers have always instilled cleanliness (especially hand washing!) into their curriculum, but now, centers are focusing on extra sanitizing as well as reducing the number of children per class so that there allows for more space (for distancing).

Please use what is being provided to you and APPLY TODAY! Visit: https://www.nccanet.org/page/Advocacy and scroll to the bottom and select "State-Level Information for Essential Workers Seeking Child Care".

Essential Employees are Eligible for FREE Child Care


Published: May 19, 2020

Did you know that child care if FREE for essential employees? Help us spread the word!

Listen to our Executive Director for more details!

Building on these existing options, the CARES Act provides additional flexibility for providing direct child care services to essential workers. Lead Agencies may use CARES Act funds to provide child care assistance to health care sector employees, emergency responders, sanitation workers, and other workers deemed essential by public officials during the response to COVID-19, without regard to the income eligibility requirements. Therefore, Lead Agencies may provide CCDF subsidies to essential workers whose income exceeds 85 percent of State median income.

Lead Agencies have the flexibility to define which workers are essential, in accordance with any relevant State, Territorial, and Tribal laws or policies. Lead Agencies should consult with their jurisdiction's chief executive, and may want to consider:

- Health care and public health workers
- Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders
- Child protective services workers, those who provide services in the child welfare system, and other critical social services workers
- Food and agriculture workers (including grocery store and restaurant workers and food truck delivery drivers)
- Child care workers
- Utility employees
- Water and waste water employees
- Transportation and logistics workers
- Public works employees
- Communications and information technology workers
- Other community-based government operations and essential function employees
- Critical manufacturing workers
- Hazardous materials workers
- Financial services employees
- Chemical workers
- Defense industrial base employees

APPLY TODAY! Scroll to the bottom and select "State-Level Information for Essential Workers Seeking Child Care".

America Works when Child Care Works! 

Published May 18, 2020

The House passed a second $3 trillion bill aimed at providing relief and support to those impacted by the coronavirus pandemic on Friday, May 15th.

The bill, known as the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions Act, or the HEROES Act, follows the first coronavirus bailout signed into law in late March with bipartisan support, the CARES Act.

The rescue package was approved with a vote of 208 to 199, but it is unlikely to pass in the Senate.

This bill includes $7 billion for CCDBG funding for the child care industry, but child care providers, advocates, and national organizations are calling for much more. In the last month, the child care sector has lost more than 300,000 workers, a third of its workforce, and data from the National Women’s Law Center and the Center for Law and Social Policy show that it will take at least $9.6B per month to sustain the child care sector. Unless Congress provides significant funding for the child care sector,  data from the Center for American Progress finds that the coronavirus pandemic could lead to a permanent loss of nearly 4.5 million child care slots.

We know that half of child care providers have already shut their doors and unless Congress provides significant funding for the industry, many of these closures will be permanent. The U.S. stands to lose half of our child care industry due to coronavirus, and parents won’t be able to go back to work and the economy will not be able to reopen without it. Congress must take action and provide significant funding in the HEROES Act.


Early educators are essential to the U.S. economy, providing critical support for families. The child industry needs substantially more funding so that the economy can reopen. Child care providers support our families, businesses, and the economy. Unless Congress provides significant funding for the child care sector, the coronavirus pandemic could lead to a permanent loss of nearly half of all child care. This is why we’re calling on Congress to act immediately.

(Info provided by Business Insider and National Women's Law Center.)



Use Your Voice for Child Care


Published May 11, 2020

With most Americans still under shelter-in-place orders, it makes sense that parents everywhere are worried about the impact these orders will have on child care. However, while the experience of parenting during the pandemic can be challenging, in states where economies are reopening, we have to wonder about the safety and health of the children. How will this be ensured?

Congress has extended its recess for the safety of congressional representatives, but the urgency for finding a solution for dedicated child care funding has never been greater. We need as many people as possible to reach out and make phone calls and send messages to their members of Congress. Congressional staffers are still keeping track of outreach, so if you sent a message earlier this month, thank you. But your representatives need to hear from you in multiple ways this week to have the most impact as the next round of coronavirus relief starts to come together. First, place your phone call. Call your member of Congress now and let them know: We need $50B in dedicated Child Care funding.

So after you place your call, take the next step! Childcareaware.org has compiled a tool kit for helping you to advocate for child care right from home! (Click here: https://www.childcareaware.org/our-issues/advocacy/day-on-the-hill-advocacy-toolkit/)

Schedule a Meeting or Call with your Legislator in Five Easy Steps

1. Do you already have a contact in the offices of your Members of Congress? If so, skip to step 3. 

2. If not, identify your legislators and find contact information. 

3. Connect with the district office through a brief email or phone call—it is best to make your request in writing and follow up with a call within a few days. Ask to speak with the district’s scheduler or another staff lead on child care to set up the meeting. You can also visit your legislator’s website and use the “Request a Meeting” form available from most members.

4. Use the email starter language and phone script below to connect with staff in your congressional offices. If you can, try to tailor it to your community and communication style.

5. Do not be discouraged if you do not hear back right away. You may have to contact the congressional office a few times to get a response. Allow at least one business day in-between follow-up. 

If you are sending an email, it should contain the following:

1. Your name and address to show that you are a constituent, as well as your organization (if applicable).

2. The issues you wish to discuss – keep it brief.

3. The local office you wish to visit (if requesting a meeting).

4. The dates that you can meet. Include several dates or a wide time frame so that there is flexibility in scheduling the meeting.

NCCA has an example email layout on the homepage of our website (nccanet.org).

Now more than ever providers, early childhood educators, parents, businesses, etc. MUST be vocal about the situation that licensed child care is facing. Without your participation, there are not enough voices to change where we are headed. Thank you for helping "America Go Back To Work" and to fund child care! (Thank you to childcareaware.org and vox.com for info!) 

 

Healthcare Relief for Unemployed

Published April 29, 2020

Healthcare is always a priority, but especially so during times like these. It is our privilege to announce this wonderful healthcare opportunity. As you know, the National Child Care Association has already added the benefit of access to healthcare coverage for you at a reduced cost. Now, at this crucial time, we are donating to our members, at no cost, remote healthcare for 100 individuals who are furloughed/unemployed employees, until we reach recovery.

If you are currently unemployed, simply follow these steps:
1. Access the RightNowSolution.care and
2. Click on the ENROLL NOW button for the Immediate Solution and at the end of the process they will
3. Supply the passcode: NCCA

By doing this, you'll receive coverage for all the important stuff with zero co-pay:

Telemedicine
Feel better now! Get access to a registered physician 24/7, right from your desktop or mobile device. Telemedicine doctors can offer treatment options, refer you to specialists, and even order prescriptions.

Telemental
True wellness starts from within.  This Counseling program enables you to access a licensed counselor anytime, anywhere. Counselors can assist with everything from depression and anxiety to struggles with addiction.

HealthCare Advisor
Prosper’s Health Advocacy program provides a team of expert negotiators to support you from start to finish when you visit the hospital or emergency room. They’ll educate you on various procedures and assess medical bills.

Medical Bill Advocacy
A recent study showed that 60% of adults who asked their doctor for a discount, got it. Bill Saver works to reduce the amount you owe by as much as possible. This way, you can spend money on the things that matter–and not and not an overpriced X-ray.

In these difficult times, we are doing our part, and with your help and support together we can assist so many people. The Remote Healthcare Solution will take effect 1 week after sign-up. The Right Now Solution will take effect 2 weeks after sign-up. You can also expect to receive your coverage card to the home address you list during signup.




HERE FOR YOU!

Published April 24, 2020The National Child Care Association is here for you today and we will be here for you in the days to come. Is there anything we can do for you? Let us know! Give us a call at 877-537-NCCA (6222) or email us at admin@nccanet.org.WAYS WE CAN HELP!
TEMPLATE LETTER TO LEGISLATORSACT (Advocate for Child Care Today) NOW!
The National Child Care Association (NCCA) works diligently to advocate for our members and child care professionals but we NEED YOUR HELP! Now is the time to advocate for yourself by calling or emailing your legislators!

We've made this easy for you!

Simply visit: https://www.nccanet.org/ 
and find links to find the contact information of your legislators along with a sample letter to send them.



UNEMPLOYED? FREE REMOTE HEALTHCARE!
At a time when healthcare has never been more important, it is our honor to notify you of a healthcare coverage opportunity. As you know, the National Child Care Association has already added the benefit of access to healthcare coverage for you at a reduced cost. Now, at this crucial time, we are donating to our members, at no cost, remote healthcare for 100 individuals who are furloughed/unemployed employees, until we reach recovery.

The benefit includes Telemedicine, which provides remote medical consultation and will enable people to understand if they should get tested. This would facilitate a reductionin the number of unneeded tests, reduce the pressure on our hospitals, reduce exposure and much more. Telemental will help many who feel isolated and alone, those who are dealing with being sick, and those whom care for a sick person. HealthCare Advisor and Medical Billing Advocacy will help those who need treatment do so at the lowest negotiable costs. None of these offerings require a co-pay.

If your unemployed, simply:
1. Access the RightNowSolution.care and
2. Click on the ENROLL NOW button for the Immediate Solution and at the end of the process they will
3. Supply the passcode: NCCA

In these difficult times, we are doing our part, and with your help and support together we can assist so many people.



There is Still Time - US Census


Published April 19, 2020

Even with the times being as unusual as they are, the Census must be taken seriously. This is a crucial time for all and the Census may prove to be more important now than ever to determine where future funds will be distributed.

The good news is that nearly half of the nation has already responded to the 2020 Census. If you have not already, please respond to the census as soon as you can (NOW!) by phone, paper, or online.  Even though field operation has been delayed, the key reference date for the 2020 Census -- April 1, 2020 -- did not change.  When responding to the Census, please note that you will be asked to include everyone who usually lives and sleeps in your home as of April 1, 2020.  

As a reminder, it has never been easier to self-respond to the census!   You can easily respond online at 2020census.gov using a smartphone, tablet, or laptop.  A Census ID is not required to respond -- you may click on the link that says "click here if you do not have a census ID" and enter your address.  Additional options include responding by calling 844-330-2020 or returning your paper form by mail.

In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, the U.S. Census Bureau is adjusting 2020 Census operations in order to:

-Protect the health and safety of the American public and Census Bureau employees.
-Implement guidance from federal, state and local authorities.
-Ensure a complete and accurate count of all communities.


The Census Bureau temporarily suspended 2020 Census field data collection activities in March. Steps are already being taken to reactivate field offices beginning June 1, 2020, in preparation for the resumption of field data collection operations as quickly as possible following June 1.

In-person activities, including all interaction with the public, enumeration, office work and processing activities, will incorporate the most current guidance to promote the health and safety of staff and the public. This will include recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) and social distancing practices.

Once 2020 Census data collection is complete, the Census Bureau begins a lengthy, thorough and scientifically rigorous process to produce the apportionment counts, redistricting information and other statistical data products that help guide hundreds of billions of dollars in public and private sector spending per year.

In order to ensure the completeness and accuracy of the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau is seeking statutory relief from Congress of 120 additional calendar days to deliver final apportionment counts.

Under this plan, the Census Bureau would extend the window for field data collection and self-response to October 31, 2020, which will allow for apportionment counts to be delivered to the President by April 30, 2021, and redistricting data to be delivered to the states no later than July 31, 2021.

(Thank you to Michelle L. Elison with the U.S. Census Bureau for this information.)


America Works When Child Care Works

Published on April 16, 2020

ACT (A
dvocate for Child Care Today) NOW!
The National Child Care Association (NCCA) works diligently to advocate for our members and child care professionals but we NEED YOUR HELP! Now is the time to advocate for yourself by calling or emailing your legislators (links below)! Share with their office your story of how rough it is now with COVID-19 and what is needed for you to survive through this and long after it. 

NOW more than ever providers, early childhood educators, parents, businesses, etc. MUST be vocal about the situation that licensed child care is facing. Without your participation there are not enough voices to change where we are headed. Please use the letter provided below to contact those in control of your future.

There are 129,000 licensed child care centers and 115,000 licensed/registered homes that, on a normal day take care of 12M children. Congress comes back into session next week. Let's light up their email and phones with a unified message. If you want and expect change you must ask for it NOW more than ever.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our way of life for an indefinite period of time. Families and child care programs across the country are struggling with how to adjust to this new reality and what it means for parents and children, especially when this crisis ends.A number of national organizations are forecasting that many providers will remain closed after the COVID-19 crisis, leaving many parents without a child care center when they need to return to work.

ALL licensed child care providers, early childhood educators, parents, and business leaders must act now to prevent this. We need your help. Use the template below or create your own with a similar message for your personal story. MOST importantly, CONTACT your elected officials and tell them to support all licensed child care providers in the US so they survive this crisis and can help support the economic recovery

The National Child Care Association is advocating for you during this crisis. We are in regular contact with our advocacy partners/agencies in Washington, D.C. to let them know your perspective and your challenges. It is time for YOU to ACT and we are making advocating as easy as possible. Together, standing with our more than 129,000 licensed programs and 115,000 licensed/registered home child care settings serving over 12M children, we are seeking more support from government so parents will have their child care program of choice available when this crisis subsides and all Americans can return to work.

Our leaders in the US Legislature must hear from enough of YOU in a unified voice in order to be a priority to them. YOU are their constituent, the voter. Your voice and issues matter and this is a critical time in the world and in our industry.

Please use the template letter below to help tell your story. Adapt it as you wish and send it as an email to YOUR Legislators (NOTE: Use the links highlighted here to find your leaders).

US Representatives | Senators | Governors

You can copy the text in the letter and paste into your email. Be sure to enter in the bottom section all of your information such as name, name of business, business address and home address.You can also post your email on social media & tag your elected officials.

--


Thank you to Christi Puesch, Executive Director of the Maryland State Child Care Association for providing us with this important information!

Dear (add your Governor and/or US Legislator's name):

I am your constituent and I run a child care center in (add your city's name). Like so many in our state right now, I am struggling, along with families and children, with the impact of the COVID-19 crisis. I wanted to tell you my story and ask that you help ensure the child care providers of (add your state's name) have the resources they need to remain in business until the crisis ends so we can care for the children and do our part in the economic recovery we all hope will be on the other side of this.

As I hope you will agree, child care is an essential function and serves as a backbone of our economy. Without it, too many parents would be kept from working and generating the economic activity to keep the stock market going and tax revenue flowing. We are a major employer, a very essential service provider that allows other businesses to flourish and we also educate, nurture and prepare our youngest children with foundations for next steps in life. We are also taxpayers and play and significant role in our communities.

Many businesses in my industry have also stepped up to do their part in this crisis, taking on health risks by keeping their doors open to provide care for the children of frontline health care workers, first responders, and other essential workers -we are serving while making it possible for all brave individuals to help serve (add your states name for their residents) during this critical time.

In best of times, child care programs like mine operate on razor thin margins and teeter on the edge of financial health. Many in our industry are in fact nonprofits. The federal and state programs announced to date are simply insufficient to help child care businesses. The federal Paycheck Protection Program in the CARES Act only provides eight weeks of payroll assistance, if providers are accepted and the money does not run out. It does not cover 100% of payroll costs, such as FICA, FUTA, and other taxes.

Federal SBA Economic Disaster Loans only provide help for payroll, rent, mortgages and utilities. Those loans will put my business deeper in debt, and does not cover all overhead, like insurance, food, supplies, taxes, and curriculum materials. Not all providers are even eligible.

Other states have recognized the critical role that child care plays in their states and have stepped up to institute plans which will reimburse child care providers for lost tuition due to this unprecedented event. We urge you to take similar action in (put your States name here). Without additional support, many child care businesses like mine will close and leave too many parents without child care when they need to get back to work.

Thank you for your leadership in this difficult time. Please help ensure child care for all families and help thousands of small businesses, such as mine stay afloat and continue to be viable after this crisis.

I hope you and your family are staying safe and healthy.

Name
Business Name and Address Home Address

--

Thank you for helping "America Go Back To Work"!

Cindy Lehnhoff
Legislative Advocate & Executive Director, NCCA 

 

FAQ on Help for Small Business in Coronavirus Stimulus Bill


The economic stimulus package included much needed relief for businesses of all sizes. For small businesses specifically, the bill included a "Paycheck Protection Program" to provide small businesses with forgivable loans to keep their employees on the payroll and pay for everyday expenses, like rent and utility payments. Here are answers to frequently asked questions about the Paycheck Protection Program, courtesy of the Senate Small Business Committee.

Q: When is the application deadline for the Paycheck Protection Program?

A: Applicants are eligible to apply for the PPP loan until June 30, 2020.

Q: Where can I apply for the Paycheck Protection Program?

A: You can apply for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) at any lending institution that is approved to participate in the program through the existing U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) lending program and additional lenders approved by the Department of Treasury. This could be the bank you already use, or a bank or credit union near you. You do not have to visit any government institution to apply for the program. Just call your bank or find SBA-approved lenders at SBA.gov.

Q: Who is eligible for the loan?

A: You are eligible for a loan if you are a small business that employs 500 employees or fewer, or if your business is in an industry that has an employee-based size standard through SBA that is higher than 500 employees. In addition, if you are a restaurant, hotel, or a business that falls within the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code 72, "Accommodation and Food Services", and each of your locations has 500 employees or fewer, you are eligible. Tribal businesses, 501(c)(19) veteran organizations, and 501(c)(3) nonprofits, including religious organizations, will be eligible for the program. Independently owned franchises with under 500 employees, who are approved by SBA, are also eligible.

Q: I am an independent contractor or gig economy worker, am I eligible?

A: Yes. Sole proprietors, independent contractors, gig economy workers, and self-employed individuals are eligible for the Paycheck Protection Program.

Q: What is the maximum amount I can borrow?

A: The amount any small business is eligible to borrow is 2.5% of their average monthly payroll expenses, up to a total of $10 million. This amount is intended to cover 8 weeks of payroll expenses and any additional amounts for making payments towards debt obligations. This 8 week period may be applied to any time frame between February 15, 2020 and June 30, 2020. Seasonal business expenses will be measured using a 12-week period beginning February 15, 2019 or March 1, 2019, whichever the seasonal employer chooses.

Q: How can I use the money to ensure the loan will be forgiven?

A: The amount that may be forgiven is equal to the total expenses for payroll, and existing interest payments on mortgages, rent, payments, leases, and utility service agreements. Payroll costs include employee salaries (up to an annual rate of pay of $100,000), hourly wages and cash tips, paid sick or medical leave, and group health insurance premiums.

Q: When is the loan forgiven?

A: The loan is forgiven at the end of the 8-week period after you take out the loan. Borrowers will work with lenders to verify covered expenses and the proper amount of forgiveness.

Q: What is the covered period of the loan?

A: The covered period extends from February 15, 2020 to June 30, 2020. Borrowers can choose which 8 weeks they want to count towards the covered period, which can start as early as February 15, 2020.

Q: How much of my loan will be forgiven?

A: The purpose of the Paycheck Protection Program is to help you retain your employees, at their current base pay. If you keep all your employees, the portion of the loan used for payroll and other covered expenses will be forgiven. If you still lay off employees, the forgiveness will be reduced by the percent decrease in the number of employees. If your total payroll expenses on workers making less than $100,000 annually decreases by more than 25%, loan forgiveness will be reduced by the same amount. If you have already laid off some employees, you can still be forgiven for the full amount of your payroll cost if you rehire your employees by June 30, 2020.

SOURCE: Thank you to Congressman Michael Waltz for providing this material.

 


Upcoming Webinar


Published on April 7, 2020

On Thursday, April 9, from 4:30-5:30 pm, we encourage you to catch the following webinar put on by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. You may register for "Paying Yourself, Your Staff, and Your Bills: Helping Child Care Programs Understand and Navigate SBA Loan Options" by following this link: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4128079429066587916 (English)

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8124410570873550094 (Spanish)

In addition to the $3.5 billion for CCDBG provided by Congress in the recent CARES Act, there are multiple options for child care programs across states and settings to get financial support to survive this crisis. Since these processes may be complex, this webinar from NAEYC is bringing together expertise from the banking, business, and child care industries with lessons from the first few days following the opening of the Paycheck Protection Program, in order to help you learn about how the different options work, which might be best for you, and what precise steps you have to take to apply for them.

The bulk of the webinar will focus on helping you understand and navigate through the SBA loan options, which we will do by having you hear from a banker; an expert who has worked at the SBA; and a child care provider who has been through the process already. In addition, how these options intersect with unemployment insurance will also be touched on.

(The webinar and above info provided by naeyc.org)

Additionally, don't neglect to take advantage of the SBA loans immediately available to child care providers (First Five Years Fund). This includes the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). PPP is a $349 billion program designed to help small businesses keep their workers on the payroll and stay afloat during the COVID crisis to avoid closing permanently. Loans provided through this program will be forgiven by the SBA if all employees are kept on the payroll for eight weeks and funds are used for payroll, rent, mortgage interest, or utilities. You may also hear this referred to as the “7(a)” program. More info can be found here: https://www.ffyf.org.


Webinar today at 3 pm EST, "Engaging Families Through the Coronavirus Pandemic": 
National Organizations Share Their Plans


Published on March 25, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has changed our way of life for an indefinite period of time. Families, educators, and other practitioners across the country are struggling with how to adjust to this new reality and what it means for children. When it comes to education during these challenging circumstances, families need access to information and learning ideas, ways to understand the information, and ways to take action on it.

In this webinar, national organizations at the forefront of providing resources and tools that parents and practitioners need to navigate through this uncharted territory will share what they are currently providing and what is planned moving forward. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share their own ideas and resources through our webinar chat feature. 

There is another webinar today, March 25 at 3 pm EST, "Engaging Families Through the Coronavirus Pandemic: National Organizations Share Their Plans," https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_n_ZOgPB-QkCUu4EuHWfXsg


ACTION ALERT: Open Now to Help #FundChildCare

Published on March 22, 2020

Help Us Protect Child Care Centers & Employees NOW!

TOMORROW, Monday, March 23 at 10am…please be sure to help us let your Senators and Congressman know that you support their vote for a $50B stimulus package to save child care centers from closing forever. 93% of all licensed childcare centers are small businesses that cannot sustain themselves through this crisis for more than 2-4 weeks. We recommend that all business leaders post this on social media encouraging your employees and supporters to join in.

Why does Congress need to #FundChildCare in the emergency stimulus package?

• To protect the health and safety of essential workers and their children

• To support small businesses

• To make sure child care programs exist in the recovery

• To prevent tens of thousands of workers from losing their jobs

• To keep the child care industry from collapsing.

• To help American families

• To stabilize an essential service

• To stimulate consumer spending

• To provide the quality care children and families need, now and in the future

On Monday, March 23 from 10:00 am ET, tell it to Congress.

Find your local representatives:

https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative

https://www.senate.gov/senators/index.htm

Join NAEYC, Child Care Aware of America, the Early Care and Education Consortium, ZERO TO THREE, and more, with thousands of your fellow educators, advocates, and allies for a #FundChildCare #ChildCareNow Twitter Storm.

Thank you!

Source: America for Early Ed


NCCA RESPONSE to COVID-19


Published on March 19, 2020

NCCA wanted to take a moment and salute you, the first responders of Early Care and Education. Many of our parents need your services in order to perform their essential responsibilities. Do what you can to take care of yourselves and your staff during this stressful and unprecedented time.

Knowing that each day brings different questions and challenges regarding COVID-19 we are pleased to refer you to Child Care Aware of America’s website at www.childcareaware.org. They are providing the latest information to help families, child care providers, and policymakers navigate this uncharted territory. At NCCA we have reviewed many resources and found this one to be the most comprehensive and best organized, allowing for quick references on a variety of topics regarding this matter.  

Of course, we are also available to assist you so please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 1-877-537-6222.

While we know you are very busy dealing with all of the demands in your day to day operation we want to be sure and draw your attention to the need to TAKE ACTION in telling Members of Congress to support the childcare and early learning system in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R.6201) . This is easily done on the www.childcareaware.org website under the heading TAKE ACTION. It is imperative that everyone RAISE THEIR VOICE to ensure that child care providers are protected from economic crisis and closure, and help provide continuity of care for children and families at this time. It literally just takes a few minutes to do this and you cannot afford to not do it. 

ACT NOW: Tell your Members of Congress to include dedicated support for child care in their COVID-19 response.

Sincerely,

Cindy Lehnhoff, Director of the National Child Care Association 



Coronavirus and Child Care


Published on March 16, 2020

Child Care Aware of America is committed to providing news and the latest information to help prepare families, child care providers and policymakers as the situation around the Coronavirus(COVID-19) outbreak continues to be monitored. To equip communities, CCAoA gathered resources to ensure the safety of all individuals. This particular article will focus on how Coronavirus impacts child care providers and CCR&Rs.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, human Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that commonly cause mild to moderate illnesses like the common cold. Almost everyone gets infected with one of these viruses at some point in their lives, and most of the time the illness lasts for a short amount of time. 

A new human Coronavirus, called the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), was discovered in Wuhan City, China, in December 2019. Symptoms are similar to the flu and can include: 

-Fever
-Cough
-Shortness of breath
-Body aches
-Tiredness
-Sore throat
-Headache
-Diarrhea
-Pneumonia

The CDC recommends protecting yourself and the children in your care by taking some basic precautions:

-Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
-Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
-Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
-Stay home when you are sick.
-Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
-Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

For child care providers, that means staying vigilant about hand hygiene and keeping a close eye on children and staff who are showing signs of illness. Daily health checks are a great way for providers to take a few moments to notice how each child is looking, feeling and acting when they first arrive. That will make it easier to notice if the child’s behavior or symptoms change throughout the day.

In the long run, it is important for child care programs to have a plan for dealing with disease outbreaks. If you don’t already have a workplace emergency plan in place, now is the time to get moving. You want to make sure you and your staff are prepared for any type of emergency.

Thank you so much to Child Care Aware for providing up-to-date information. For more, please visit: https://info.childcareaware.org/coronavirus-updates


ARE YOU CURRENTLY AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF NCCA?


Published on March 3, 2020

At the National Child Care Association we know:

* YOU need more funding in your child care centers to ensure your ability to deliver quality care and education to young children

* YOU need to have a say in what rules and regulations are put into place that affect your ability to balance a reputable and sustainable business model

* YOU want to be part of a unified voice to bring about positive changes for all the hard working people in early care and education 

We also know you have limited time to be your own VOICE so let us work for you and with you!  

If you're already a member we thank you and promise to continue to work for you. Check and see if your membership is still active HERE.

If you need to renew, want to refer a colleague or join please click HERE.

Only $30/Annually – Help Us Be The Voice For YOU!

YOUR annual membership fee helps give all licensed private child care providers and educators a much needed VOICE in Washington, D.C.

Coming soon:
* A new and more informative NCCA Website
* Professional Development Opportunities
* Annual D.C. Advocacy Conference

Voice of Childcare Educators & Children


Published on February 27, 2020

I presented this past weekend at the South Carolina Early Childhood Education Annual Conference. We met some amazing people who are ready to be the voice of children through advocacy. If you have an opportunity for me to present about how the National Child Care Association is working for childcare educators and facilities, please contact us.

Also, listen to what Tiffany has to say about her time as an educator involved in early childcare and how important it is to get involved. While you're there, please be sure to follow us on Instagram.

Cindy Lehnhoff

New NCCA Director
Published on February 12, 2020

Hello valued NCCA member:

Let me introduce myself. My name is Cindy Lehnhoff and I am your new Director of the NCCA. I have 36 years of experience as a provider of early care and education. I am also a former Board Member of the NCCA. Additionally I have served on the NECPA Board for 15+ years. In case you have not heard NCCA has joined the NECPA family as the advocacy and lobby arm of the overall organization which also includes the NAC and CCP Credentials. Our team is working diligently to move NCCA into an organization that brings meaningful and consistent representation for you in Washington D.C. As a member of NCCA you have a voice in government that is asking our US Legislators to support bills that improve the lives of children, families, and early care and education professionals like yourself.

We are also in the process of updating our website, www.nccanet.org, to include newsletters that keep you informed about our activities on your behalf and present professional development opportunities for you. You can also look forward to hearing from us periodically by email.

 

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